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Presidential Campaign Shifts to Second Debate

October 16, 2012
The Intelligencer / Wheeling News-Register

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (AP) - Three weeks before Election Day, President Barack Obama on Monday embraced the economic record many Republicans say is his biggest weakness.

The president's first act in this critical campaign week was to announce a new battleground state advertisement featuring voters discussing the ways their economic conditions have improved during his term. The ad was hitting the airwaves as Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney huddled in intense preparation for their second debate as polls show a closely fought campaign.

"This race is tied," Obama said in an appeal to supporters asking them to donate at least $5 to his re-election effort. He promised to be "fighting" for the election on the debate stage tonight - something many of his supporters thought he did too little of in his first face-off with Romney.

Article Photos

AP Photo
A worker looks out from a cut-out in the set Monday as stand-ins for the candidates run through a rehearsal ahead of tonight’s presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y.

Early voting is under way in dozens of states, giving the candidates little chance to recover from any slip-ups that come in these final days. Obama has been trying to get his supporters to lock in their choice now, and his campaign announced Monday that he and his wife, Michelle, would become the first president and first lady to cast their ballots early.

Obama planned to vote early during a visit to his home state of Illinois next week, while Michelle Obama told a rally in Delaware, Ohio, that she dropped her absentee ballot in the mail Monday. "For me, it was Election Day," she said.

Obama's campaign aides say they are encouraged by a few public and private surveys showing voters growing more confident about the direction of the economy. Those trends are behind the new ad the campaign is running in Colorado, Iowa, Nevada and Virginia.

"Stick with this guy," a gravelly voiced man says at the end of the commercial in a point Obama hopes wavering voters will embrace. A second ad targeted at Ohio voters features former astronaut and Sen. John Glenn touting Obama's character and economic record.

Aides argue that some voters got a psychological boost when the unemployment rate fell below 8 percent last month for the first time since Obama's inauguration. But the campaign says it puts more stock in economic indicators showing an increase in consumer confidence and retail spending, which indicate shifts in voter behavior.

Still, with millions of Americans still out of work, the campaign is trying to walk a fine line between touting economic gains and acknowledging that many voters are still struggling.

No president since World War II has won re-election with the unemployment rate above 7.3 percent.

GOP vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan lambasted Obama's handling of the deficit during an appearance Monday in Ryan's home state of Wisconsin. He pointed to a digital scoreboard his campaign set up at the far end of Carroll University's field house that tracked the growth of the nation's deficit in real time.

"Look at how fast those numbers are running," Ryan said. "We know without a shred of doubt that we have consigned the next generation to this path of debt."

He acknowledged that Obama inherited "a tough situation" when he took office but argued the president has only made things worse. He touted Romney's plan to cut taxes by 20 percent across the board as the path back to economic growth.

Obama campaign spokeswoman Jennifer Psaki said the president would seek to run on his economic record, not away from it, during Tuesday's debate.

"He would be happy to spend the entire debate talking about their visions for the middle class," Psaki told reporters gathered in Williamsburg, Va., where Obama and his advisers were in the midst of an intense, three-day "debate camp" at a posh golf resort.

Obama's campaign, seeking to rebound from a dismal first debate, promised a more energetic president would take the stage today at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. Romney's team aimed to build on a commanding opening debate performance.

 
 

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