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Pruning A Shrub Rose

March 3, 2010
By Kathy Bond-Borie

By Kathy Bond-Borie

Many a gardener has stood before a favorite rose shrub with pruners in hand, hesitant to make the first cut. Thorns aside, it can be downright intimidating to cozy up to a shrub rose to try to direct its future growth and flowering.

Fortunately these plants don't need a lot of pruning and are very forgiving. Their fast growth will soon cover any pruning cuts, and their informal shape doesn't necessitate taming. With some basic tools and guidelines, you can tidy up the plant and encourage abundant flowering. The main reasons to prune a rose are to remove dead and damaged canes, increase blooming and decrease disease and pest problems. The best time to prune is early spring just before new growth begins, but remove spent flowers and dead canes whenever they occur. The goal is to keep the center of the shrub free of twiggy, weak growth that's especially susceptible to attack by insects and disease.

In cold-climate areas, wait to prune until the buds just begin to swell in spring.

A former floral designer and interior plantscaper, Kathy Bond-Borie has spent 20 years as a garden writer/editor, including her current role as Horticultural Editor for the National Gardening Association. She loves designing with plants, and spends more time playing in the garden - planting and trying new combinations - than sitting and appreciating it.

Courtesy of Family Features

 
 

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