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Water In Mines Could Be Used

Committee told that liquid could be treated for fracking process

June 21, 2013

WHEELING — The local region has many abandoned coal mines filled with water, and this water could be treated and used in the fracking process, West Virginia lawmakers heard Thursday....

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mkhunt

Jun-21-13 9:13 PM

Do you think the water may be contaminated and that is why so many people are having neurological and competency problems..first, frac water has been illegally dumped in old mines and second, we have a big problem with the levels of toxic chemicals in coal slurry and waste water. WAKE UP and save what we have left. this is not about politics but about human lives..the Bush family moved away from Midland, Texas after their 3 year old daughter died of leukemia and they did not fight to save the other children who have died over the years..why? the family money was coming from the gas and oil companies who did the contamination crimes...God help us!

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idliketoknow

Jun-21-13 1:11 PM

"only 26 showed genuinely appreciable water accumulations "

ONLY 26?!? have you seen the size of these mines? A few years back, the company I currently work for was in panic mode because there was so much water accumulating in the mines along the Mon River, the mine pool very nearly broke out which would have caused an environmental disaster.

"That leaves open how much it would cost to pump the water up and to the well site. *And, the pumping/treating you spoke of is being done only at active, below-drainage mines that are encountering inflow*, perhaps from older works."

False. We shell out millions of dollars every year treating water pumped from abandoned mines, which if left alone the results would be catastrophic.

Growing mine pools pose a serious environmental threat, you should be pumped about this proposal you old enviro you!

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WVUGEO

Jun-21-13 12:47 PM

Ideliketoknow: Thanks! If you examine the reports, you'll see how unrealistic the proposal herein is. Of 1300 older mine works surveyed in "WV173 Monongahela Basin Mine Pool Project", only 26 showed genuinely appreciable water accumulations - enough to support a fracking operation. That leaves open how much it would cost to pump the water up and to the well site. And, the pumping/treating you spoke of is being done only at active, below-drainage mines that are encountering inflow, perhaps from older works. That, actually, is spelled out quite clearly in "Monitoring of Pittsburgh seam mine water and hydrogeology in northern West Virginia (project HRC-5)". There's other negative data in the reports we won't go into, but it all serves to convince us the proposal in this article is just another part of the gas industry's smoke and mirrors show; intended to deflect attention away from real issues.

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idliketoknow

Jun-21-13 11:59 AM

Everyone loves maps!

w w w .hrc.nrcce.wvu.edu/maplist.htm

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idliketoknow

Jun-21-13 11:48 AM

Lets try it this way:

w w w .hrc.nrcce.wvu.edu/final/2004report/FinalReport.pdf

w w w.hrc.nrcce.wvu.edu/outgoing/HRC5ReportFinal.pdf

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idliketoknow

Jun-21-13 11:47 AM

Here you go, from a WVU professor Joe Donovan. I'm a fan of these scholarly papers. How much time do you have?

*******w w w .hrc.nrcce.wvu.edu/final/2004report/FinalReport.pdf

*******w w w. hrc.nrcce.wvu.edu/HRC5-FinalReport.htm

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WVUGEO

Jun-21-13 11:30 AM

idliketoknow: Exactly. The mines that do fill up with water are below drainage. And, not all mines fill up with water, by the way, in the near term at least. Once, back in the early 70's, we holed through into some old works that weren't on any maps. We were, roughly, according to faulty memory, at least several hundred feet down. No idea how old they were, but looked into the hole while doing a gas check before powering back up - - we knocked power to section immediately when we holed through - - and backing out; and, it was OLD. Who could have sunk that deep, as long ago as it looked like someone did, nobody had any idea. But, you spoke of "pools" in the mines. That's senseless. The gas wells require 2 to 4 million gallons EACH, according to most references, for fracking. You'd have to draw from a fully-flooded mine to make the concept even halfways sensible. And, that's total news to us that old, abandoned and sealed mines have to be pumped out when they flood. Since when

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idliketoknow

Jun-21-13 10:48 AM

Thats not really how it works WVUGEO. Being a coal guy, I'm sure you had to keep track of mine pools. The mines that they would pull water from are well below drainage. Heck, mine companies have to pump the water out anyways because the DEP tells them they have to. Might as well make a buck on it. Valley Camp #3 is completely flooded, it would be a great candidate for this plan.

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WVUGEO

Jun-21-13 9:42 AM

This is just more shale gas industry nonsense. If an abandoned mine is emptied of the tainted water it already contains, so that water can be pumped down a shale well, with some of it coming back up loaded with even worse stuff than is already in it from the abandoned mine, the abandoned mine will just fill up with more water that might otherwise, since the mine was full, have flowed into streams or aquifers and been usable. It's six of one or half a dozen of the other, hidden behind a sham of inherently self-contradictory environmental concern. There is no real sense or genuine value to this proposal, at all. It is an illusion crafted to deceive, beguile and seduce.

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mikeyd

Jun-21-13 8:19 AM

we used to drink the water that ran out of the old mines around here while out playing in the woods.we called it copper water because of the color.from what i remember it tasted okay.none of us ever got sick from it.

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